The heritage of Caithness...

... is Gaelic. Someone please pass this on to those councillors up to their necks in culture denial who think that removing Gaelic from Caithness' signs will miraculous fill the potholes in the roads.

Sure, Caithness has a Pictish and a Norse heritage too but recent research - not exactly rocket science either - has revealed parts of Caithness remained Gaelic speaking until well into the 20th C. These were native Gollachs too though if you add the Gaels who moved their in recent decades as well as the Gollachs who have learned Gaelic and put their kids into the croileagan there, it means that Caithness has had a continuous Gaelic heritage for a millenium or more.

I wonder when the last Norse was spoken there? And, was Norse spoken by...er incomers? And, is this 'Norse heritage' just a smokescreen to hide good auld naked bigotry? Sad that some still hail the Scottish cringe... and what could be more cringeworthy than the Scottish language?

From the BBC:

Gàidhlig nan Gallach na bu làidire na bha dùil

Tocasaid

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